Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally by Drinking Water

10/05/2016 | 1 min. read

Dr. Stephen Sinatra

Dr. Stephen Sinatra

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally by Drinking Water

Did you know that one of the benefits of drinking water is normal blood pressure? In fact, staying adequately hydrated is one of the simplest ways to lower your blood pressure naturally.

How does not drinking enough water raise your blood pressure? Water intake affects blood pressure in two ways. First, when you don’t drink enough water your body attempts to secure its fluid supply by retaining sodium. Sodium is your body’s “water-insurance mechanism.”

At the same time, dehydration forces your body to gradually and systematically close down some of its capillary beds. When some capillary beds shut down, it puts more pressure in the “pipes”—your capillaries and arteries—elevating your blood pressure. So, one of the best ways to lower your blood pressure naturally is by staying well-hydrated.

Do's and Don'ts for Lowering Your Blood Pressure Naturally with Water

  • DO drink the right amount of water. To get the maximum health benefits of drinking water, you need to drink eight to ten 8-ounce glasses of water per day.
  • DON'T overdo it. While I want you to get the health benefits of drinking water, I don't want you to go overboard. Like a sponge, your body can absorb water at a limited rate. It will require some time to adapt to your new level of water intake and become fully hydrated. Drinking too much water can overwork your kidneys and digestive system. Hypertension, diabetes, and stress all leave the kidneys in a weakened state, so be careful. Finally, if you have congestive heart failure, kidney issues, or are taking diuretics and/or are on fluid restrictions, consult your physician before increasing your water intake. That’s because hypertension, diabetes, and stress all leave the kidneys in a weakened state.
  • DO drink more water when you exercise. You lose water through sweat and evaporation. So, to get the full benefits of drinking water you want to hydrate well before, during, and after exercise.
Dr. Stephen Sinatra

Meet Dr. Stephen Sinatra

Dr. Stephen Sinatra is a highly respected and sought-after cardiologist and nutritionist with more than 30 years of clinical practice, research, and study. His integrative approach to heart health focuses on reducing inflammation in the body and maximizing the heart's ability to produce and use energy.

More About Dr. Stephen Sinatra